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20121129
20121207
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? >> reporter: scott, this republican counterproposal today is long on reducing the deficit and saving big on medicare, but it leaves the two sides still hundreds of billions of dollars apart and they are not close on the basic approach to solve the fiscal cliff. in a letter to the president, house republicans called their offer a fair middle ground. it's a ten-year framework that cuts the deficit by $2.2 trillion. it includes $600 billion in health care cuts-- mostly medicare and medicaid-- $300 billion in other mandatory spending and $300 billion in cuts to all other federal spending. by contrast, the president has proposed around $600 billion in cuts to all entitlements, including medicare and he'd reduce other federal spending by $100 billion a year. the president has also proposed spending $50 billion in new stimulus and republicans have refused to consider it. the biggest difference by far is in how to raise new revenues. republicans would raise $800 billion by reducing tax loopholes, not with a tax rate increase. the president would double new revenues to $1.6 trillion, with most of
of it right, then a lot of the other issues surrounding deficit reduction in a fair and balanced, responsible way are going to be a whole lot easier. >> reporter: white house officials say mr. obama is not interested in personally meeting with congressional republicans because those meetings did little to resolve the 2010 debt ceiling crisis. but when mr. obama later skipped congressional meetings and campaigned to extend the 2% payroll tax cut and maintain lower student loan interest rates, he won. the president is primarily focused on step one of this process-- winning the middle class tax cut debate. step two is being led by his treasury secretary jim geithner and liaison rob nabors. they are going to work with congress on spending cut and other fiscal cliff details. the first meeting will be tomorrow on the hill. >> pelley: major, president said today he thought all this could be done by christmas. why does he think so? >> reporter: because that is the big takeaway, scott, from the president's conversation on saturday with house speaker john boehner. the two agreed it was in foeryone's be
. congressional republicans called it an insulting joke. here's the big picture-- $4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next 10 years. it includes $1.6 trillion in higher taxes on households make manage more than $250,000. there's also $400 billion in cuts to entitlement programs, like medicaid and medicare, as well as others. there is also fresh new aending. $50 billion next year in stimulus spending, all for infrastructure. the white house calls this an opening bid. house republicans call it a rehash of old ideas and also object to the idea of a white house asking a permanent legislative remedy to raising the debt ceiling, all of it, the republicans say rather, is unacceptable. now much of this was conveyed in a 28-minute phone conversation yesterday between president obama and house speaker john boehner. both sides describe that conversation, scott, as direct and candid. those are words custom early reserved for diplomacy between sworn adversaries and tonight that might be where we are. >> pelley: major, thanks very much. now, have a look at these two pictures. president obama and mitt romn
, pay cut contributions will go from 4.% to 6.2%, that's $115 billion a year that will go to deficit reduction instead of being pumped into the economy. heidi cherholts is an economist. >> it's less money for consumers to spend that means the demand for goods and services will drop. who provides goods and services? workers. so employment will fall. >> reporter: those in favor of allowing the tax cut to expire argue money for social security payments has to come from somewhere. with although mejia says that somewhere will mean doing without some of the basics. >> might be a pair of sneakers. might be that jacket that they want to go to school with in the winter. might be those pair of boots that they want to go and keep warm. >> reporter: for john mejia, the debate in washington is not about the federal budget it's about his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> pelley: well, a lot of families with tight budgets will be happy to hear this next story: the housing market is coming back. we got a report today that says home prices in october had their biggest gai
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4